THE BLOG

24
Jun

The Path of Least Resistance

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Raul “Boca” Torres keeps Our Kaka‘ako gearing up for fitness.

Text by Kelli Gratz

In his best American accent, Raul “Boca” Torres, accomplished tri-athlete and founder of Boca Hawaii, impersonates what he describes as a type-A Ironman: “I can’t go to dinner, I gotta go to bed at 8 o’clock because tomorrow I have to wake up at 5 a.m. to train, and then I’m going to have my protein shake!” he says with a laugh. “I’m not like that. But, when you spend so much time with yourself, some people become egocentric. Everything is about the race. People think they are better than others, but I don’t buy any of that. I like to do different things, go out, and have a drink, have fun.” Continue Reading..

21
Jun

Events

May

Showdown in Chinatown
May 10, 7 p.m.–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
Designed to provide an outlet for underground, established and aspiring filmmakers, the short film competition continues in its 9th year.

Honolulu Night Market
May 17, 6 p.m.–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
Honolulu Night Market continues again offering art, music, food, and fashion throughout Our Kaka‘ako streets.
Info: honolulunightmarket.com

Art+Flea
May 22, 5–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
A monthly, themed shopping experience featuring more than 60 local artisans whose wares range from apparel to jewelry to art with live local entertainment, food, full bar, and contests.
Info: artandflea.com

Eat the Street
May 30, 4–9 p.m.
555 South St.
A food truck and street food rally with more than 40 local food vendors celebrating local culinary delights. 
Info: streetgrindz.com

Pewa II: New works by Carl Pao & Solomon Enos
Through May
SPF Projects, 729 Auahi St.
In light of recent talks to carve replacement phalluses on ki‘i that were censored decades ago, this highly charged show will deal with cultural and celestial emasculation and propagation. 
Info: spfprojects@gmail.com

 

June

Honolulu Night Market
June 21, 6 p.m.–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
Honolulu Night Market continues again offering art, music, food, and fashion throughout Our Kaka‘ako streets.
Info: honolulunightmarket.com

Art+Flea
June 26, 5–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
A monthly, themed shopping experience featuring more than 60 local artisans whose wares range from apparel to jewelry to art with live local entertainment, food, full bar, and contests.
Info: artandflea.com

Eat the Street
June 27, 4–9 p.m.
555 South St.
A food truck and street food rally with more than 40 local food vendors celebrating local culinary delights. 
Info: streetgrindz.com

New works by Bradley Capello
Through June
SPF Projects, 729 Auahi St.
This yet-to-be-titled show featuring new works by Bradley Capello will have the young contemporary artist making work that utilizes a vintage bathroom stall and a McDonald’s sign. 
Info: spfprojects@gmail.com

 

July

Honolulu Night Market
July 19, 6–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
Honolulu Night Market continues again offering art, music, food, and fashion throughout Our Kaka̒ako streets.
Info: honolulunightmarket.com

Art+Flea
July 24, 5–11 p.m.
449 Cooke St.
A monthly, themed shopping experience featuring more than 60 local artisans whose wares range from apparel to jewelry to art with live local entertainment, food, full bar, and contests.
Info: artandflea.com

Eat the Street
July 25, 4–9 p.m.
555 South St.
A food truck and street food rally with more than 40 local food vendors celebrating local culinary delights. 
Info: streetgrindz.com

17
Jun

Leveling Up

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Precision Parkour challenges the traceur to “level up in real life.”

Text by Naomi Taga | Image by Peta Ulatan

Parkour is an action movie in real-time. If you find yourself in need of a quick exit or cornered by 10 feet of brick wall, parkour is your best ally. The worldwide movement known as parkour takes one on an adrenaline-laden adventure catapulted by the ability to perceive your surroundings in a new fashion; it’s where concrete jungle becomes concrete playground. Continue Reading..

10
Jun

Fish Tales

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Brooks Takenaka talks growing up in Kaka‘ako in a family of fishers.

Text by Sonny Ganaden | Images by John Hook

“This is the nickel tour,” Brooks Takenaka says while making the 6 a.m. rounds at United Fishing Agency, found at the end of Pier 38 in Honolulu Harbor. “How much time you got? Because if you want the full dollar tour, you’d have to spend weeks here. There’s a lot that goes into selling these fish, from compliance to our interaction with the ecosystem,” he says, pointing out circular gouges on several bigeye tunas made by the innocuously-named but terrifying cookie cutter shark. Continue Reading..

03
Jun

‘Ulu maika: A Game of Skill

NailMaterials

Text by Vincent Van Der Gouwe I Image courtesy of Kamehameha Schools

In ancient times, rainy winter months brought a cause for celebration. It’s easy to imagine young ali‘i sitting near the shoreline of Kewalo, stirred by the first sight of the faint star cluster Pleiades, which marked the beginning of the winter season known as ho‘oilo. During this time, Lono, the god of rain and fertility, was honored in a four-month-long celebration called Makahiki. A kapu was placed on activities associated with the god Kū like deep-sea fishing and warfare, and time was dedicated to ceremonies, feasts, and games. The recent unearthing of stones used for a game called ‘ulu maika as part of a test excavation in West-Kaka‘ako reminds us of times of celebration, simple outdoor fun, and the preservation of Hawaiian traditions in Our Kaka‘ako.Continue Reading..